Top 3 Human Behaviorial Designs that Lead to a Good Website Design

A great website is a language, not just a style. Yes, we all do love aesthetically pleasing designs but it is important we understand human behaviors and their thought processes so we can design how users interact with our websites.

Written by

Reed Tan Digital Marketing Lead Generation Singapore Website Design Social Media Marketing Branding

Featured on Strait Times in 2013, Reed is a battle-tested digital marketing consultant who has years of experiences in lead generation, search engine optimisation and digital advertising. He enjoys culinary and occasionally prepares meals for friends and family.

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June 28, 2021

A great website is a language, not just a style.

Yes, we all do love aesthetically pleasing website designs that excite visitors.

However, that is not the ultimate goal of the website.

If you are providing a product or a service, you want to generate leads for your website. If you are running an ecommerce website, you would want to increase conversion rate for your online sales.

While a great design helps to increase time spent on the website, we also need to understand human behaviors and their thought processes so we can design how users interact with our websites.

Users Don’t Read Everything

One of the biggest issues we noticed when clients contacted us for a website revamp is their cluttered website wireframe. It’s not uncommon for businesses wanting to stuff every bit of content they have especially in their landing pages.

The truth is, most users are impatient. Especially they come to your website to find a solution to solve their problem.

It is important we design specific breakpoints and spacing with the website so users can focus on exactly what we want them to see.

If your website is cluttered and users are unable to find what they want within a few seconds, they will exit the website in a jiffy.

Don’t Make Users Think

Author of best selling book “A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability”, Steve Krug, pointed out that the first law of usability is not to make users think.

The design of the website or its landing pages should be self-evident and obvious.

Users should be able to “get it” instantly within the first glance of the web page. The longer the time taken for users to understand the content, the lesser time they have to consider for decision making on the website.

What we want to do is to remove all possible obstacles they have that hinders the decision making process.

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Steer the Direction Users Navigate

Having a clean website design is fruitless if users don’t know where they should be looking at or where they should take action

For a start, we can create visual elements to help users to navigate in the website.

When a new user first visits a web page, the first thing he or she will try to do is to scan the page and break down different parts of the web page into digestible pieces of information.

If you help the user to break down the content area beforehand, you can steer where they should be looking at. For example, what are the important points they should be looking at, or where should be they looking at to help them to finalise their decision making process.

What do you think? Share with us your thoughts and opinions below.

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